Studying in Italy places you in the heart of the Mediterranean Sea and into a vibrant country, rich in history, art, architecture, culture and cuisine. When you study in a foreign country, it gives you a sense of discovery, but not in the same way as being a tourist. When studying in Italy, first of all, you are stepping out of your comfort zone. Second, you are taking in your surroundings while cultivating friendships, settling into the ritual of attending classes, finding local places to eat and hang out as well as going on excursions and field trips. Whether you are interested in an Italian language immersion or another subject, studying in Italy warrants consideration for so many reasons.

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Why Study in Italy 
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The great thing about an Italy Study trip is that there are so many reasons to find a program that fits your study goals or checks a few things off your bucket list (e.g. eat FRESH pizza in Naples where it was invented?) Do you have a foreign language requirement? If so, studying Italian in Italy means you get to practice in real-time settings, like when you order your morning expresso, or say “buongiorno” to your professor in the morning. Plus, you get to pick up on local dialects, which isn’t something you always get in a language lab. Also, Italy borders with France, Switzerland, Austrian and Slovenia so you may pick up a few other foreign phrases as you go along! The history of Italy comes alive when you study there; for one thing, you are literally walking on soil that has a legacy (think Roman Empire). Plus, Italy has 51 UNESCO Heritage sites which is more than any country in the world, with enough art and architecture, museums and monuments (about 100,000 just FYI) to keep you enthralled, even if history is an elective. If you happen to be majoring in art or architecture, or just want an enriching experience, a Study Abroad in Italy should be top choice. See the Sistine Chapel, the Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Trevi Fountain, Michelangelo’s ‘David’, Da Vinci’s ‘Last Supper’ and works by Bernini, Raphael and Caravaggio. “When in Rome… !” It is these extra ingredients to education that sometimes affect us the most! Depending on what season you go, Italy is geographically splendid, so you could feasibly lay on the beaches of Capri, or do some hiking in the Italian Alps. Otherwise get your steps in walking your host city or rent a bike. Plenty of ways to stay active. Of course, you may just want to chill and watch a soccer game with your local friends; Italy’s soccer team has won 4 FIFA World Cups.
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About Italy 
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Italy is a beautiful country located in Southwestern Europe, on the Apennine peninsula. The country comprises of the mainland Italy and the surrounding islands. The country stretches southwards almost to the coasts of North Africa. Italy is a country full of contrasts: stunning old cities, the Mediterranean and breathtaking natural views, passionate people and simple but delightful food. At the same time, it is among the 8 most industrialised countries in the world, hosting many of the world’s biggest companies and research facilities. Italy has a rich cultural tradition and history as well as many World Heritage Sites that you might wish to visit during your stay, but it is the prestigious universities that make Italy an attractive destination for all international students.
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Some of the top tourist attractions in Italy include: –
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• The Colosseum: the largest and most famous amphitheatre in the Roman world, built in the first century AD.
• Canals of Venice: “The City of Water”, as Venice is called, has over 150 canals. The main tourist attractions are romantic gondolas and Italian architecture along the Grand Canal. If you plan on visiting Venice, don’t forget about St Mark’s Basilica, located on Piazza San Marco.
• Pompeii: a town that was covered in ash and soil in 79 AD, when the volcano Vesuvius erupted, preserving the city under ashes
• Leaning Tower of Pisa: its construction started in 1173 and soon after the tower began to sink due to a poorly laid foundation.
• Lake Como: the lake is shaped like an inverted ‘Y’ and it’s famous for the attractive villas which have been built here since Roman times
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Cost of Studying & Living in Italy 
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Tuition fees at Italian universities vary, but they are generally much lower than in other parts of Western Europe or North America, making Italian universities an enticing proposition for foreign students. Those who wish to study in Italy have a chance to receive a quality higher education at an affordable cost. The cost of tuition fees depend upon several factors. The most important is whether the university in question is a state or a private institution. State universities have much lower tuition fees. Tuition fees also depend on your country of origin; they are more affordable for EU students, but even non-EU students may find them more affordable than fees in other Western European or North American universities. Also, fees will depend on your chosen programme and level of study. For example, you can expect to pay around £680-£800 per year (€850 – €1,000) for undergraduate tuition fees. Also bear in mind that state universities in Italy have a means-tested element to their tuition fees. This means the fees are weighted depending on a student’s parental income. The next thing you need to consider is accommodation. Most Italian universities don’t have halls of residence, however they often provide accommodation services to help students to find appropriate rental apartments or shared rooms in the private rental market. These options usually come at a lower cost if you use the university services to find your accommodation. There are various types of financial assistance you may be eligible to receive while studying in Italy. There are some scholarships available and international students are eligible to apply for student loans and grants. However, keep in mind that financial assistance is often merit-based or means-tested so it may not be available to all students. Check the websites of your chosen universities to learn about the scholarships and grants that might be available to you. Another option you may wish to consider to help with your finances is to seek employment whilst you study. EU students can work in Italy without additional permission, while for non-EU students employment rights are regulated through your study visa status. To increase your chances of finding employment you will find it useful to have good Italian language skills.
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Visas 
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The entry and visa regulations you need to complete to study in Italy will depend on several factors; first of which is your nationality. When it comes to your citizenship and visa requirements to study abroad in Italy:
• If you are from EU: You don’t need a visa to study in Italy.
• If you are from a non-EU country: You will probably need a student visa to study in Italy. For more details, contact the Italian embassy or consulate in your country and your desired university to inform yourself about the details on how to obtain your student visa.
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Please note that visa requirements are not the only thing you need to think about. Anyone who wishes to study abroad in Italy, even if they are from the EU, need to have a residence permit. EU students have to apply for a residence permit within 3 months of arrival. For students outside EU, the conditions of your stay will be handled through your student visa. Some other factors that may come into play are your level of study and the duration of your courses and programme. All students will need to present details of accommodation, proof of financial stability and a comprehensive health insurance policy. For these reasons, it’s highly advisable to seek accommodation as soon as you’re accepted by an Italian university. Another thing to keep in mind is your language proficiency. You need a high competency in Italian if your course and programmes are taught and delivered in Italian. You may need to complete a language test or show evidence of language proficiency.
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Languages 
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In order to fully appreciate life and study in Italy, you should be able to speak the Italian language. This will help you to get by in day to day situations and may also be important for your studies. Many programmes at Italian universities are taught in English, particularly business related courses, but most of the available courses are taught in Italian. You may need to pass a proof of language proficiency test before you can start your studies or are able to enrol. If your Italian is not great, there are many language courses offered to international students so you can improve your language skills whilst you study, or before you arrive in Italy.
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Cities
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Rome 
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Where to start with the Italian capital? Well, most people probably start with the main sights – the Colosseum, the Trevi Fountain, the Pantheon, the Forum, the Spanish Steps or the catacombs. But as a student in Rome, the fun lies in discovering new sides to the “Eternal City”. You might take in a show in one of Rome’s many theatres, or enjoy a large outdoor performance at the Stadio Falminio or Olympic Studying in Italy Stadium. If you’re keen on literature, why not enjoy a night out at a ‘book bar’ – a fusion of bar, library and book club? For bargain hunters, Rome’s antique fairs and flea markets offer reams of vintage and secondhand goodies. If you’re brave enough, you might even rent a scooter and try to navigate the notoriously chaotic Roman traffic.
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Milan 
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Celebrated as one of world’s best cities for students, Milan offers the full package: world-class universities, a high standard of living, and a large and diverse student population. A thriving economic hub in the north of Italy, Milan retains a strong sense of its past, while simultaneously representing modern urban Italian life. The city’s cosmopolitan population coexists alongside a wealth of historical sites, including the Santa Maria alle Grazie Basilica, a UNESCO World Heritage Site which contains the famous painting The Last Supper. As well as being Italy’s leading financial centre, Milan is recogniDed as a world leader in the fashion and design industries, designated a ‘Fashion Capital of the World’ alongside London, Paris and New York. If sports are more your thing, you’ll probably know Milan as the home of celebrated football teams AC Milan and Internazionale.
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Pisa 
 
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Once you’ve climbed the famous Leaning Tower and taken one of those photos where you pretend to be holding it up, you’ll find there’s a lot more to Pisa than this iconic landmark! Pisa has more than 20 historic churches, several palaces and a series of stunning bridges across the River Arno. During the summer, you’ll find students relaxing along the banks of the river, sipping drinks from one of the area’s good wine bars. While you might not find so many clubs or live music venues in Pisa, the city does offer some alternative music venues, disco bars and karaoke bars. Meanwhile, you can enjoy a leisurely dinner or drink at one of the city’s restaurants and bars, have a walk in Piazza Garibaldi and the riverside Lungarni, or treat yourself at one of Pisa’s spas. The city gets much of its life from its student population, who organiDe all kinds of parties, shows and cultural events.
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Bologna 
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Although less familiar to foreigners, Bologna is well-known among Italians, and not just because it is the largest city and capital of the Emilia-Romagna region. Bologna is known as the culinary capital of Italy, famous for its cuisine (la cucina Bolognese). It’s also been named a Creative City for Music by UNESCO, and is known for well-preserved historic center. The city’s pervasive shades of red, from terracotta to burnt oranges and warm yellows, have given it the nickname Bologna la rossa (Bologna the red). Having developed around one of the world’s oldest universities, Bologna remains very much a university town, with a large and diverse student population. There is a thriving nightlife, active gay scene, good live music scene, and almost a hundred concerts every year featuring international rock, electronic and alternative bands. Other studybreak activity options include a restored silent and sound films festival in July, three major car museums (Ducati, Lamborghini and Ferrari), and a Formula One collection.

For more information about study options in Italy, please contact  Equinox Education Services and we will happily manage the whole process for you!

If you are a school, institution or group and wish to explore tailor-made options please click on this link  https://equinoxlearnabroad.com/tailor-made-tripprogramme/

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Or alternatively, please click on one of our partner Institute links below from our website or search under Italy as the Country option.
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For Further information about the range of options in Italy – please click on the pages 33 – 42 of the attached ‘Equinox Study Abroad Directory’ link https://equinoxlearnabroad.com/wp-content/uploads/eq_uploads/EQUINOX_ebook_08-06-17.pdf
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If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us directly via:- 
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Equinox Education Services Ltd
Carlow Gateway Business Centre

Athy Road
Carlow
IRELAND

Hours 9am to 5.00pm, Monday to Friday
or
BY APPOINTMENT

Tel : +353 (0) 59-9179340
Mobile :  +353 (0) 87-9975625

E-mail : info@equinox4study.com
Web : www.equinoxlearnabroad.com